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Ensign with the regimental colour of the 15th Regiment of Foot, 1757-1767

Caption: Ensign with the regimental colour of the 15th Regiment of Foot, 1757-1767

All regiments of infantry (or 'foot') in the British army of the 18th century had two colours. Each colour was carried by a junior officer called an ensign. The King's colour was blue with the red and white crosses of St. George and St. Andrew superimposed. This was the 'union flag' of Great Britain, carried after England and Scotland united in 1701. The second (or 'regimental') colour was same colour as a unit's facings (yellow for the 15th Foot), with a small depiction of the union flag in one corner. The regiment's name ('XV REGt.' here) was displayed in the centre, often within a wreath of roses (for England) and thistles (for Scotland). The 15th followed their colours from the siege of Louisbourg (1758), through Battle of the Plains of Abraham (1759) to the final surrender of New France at Montreal in 1760. Reconstruction by G. A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)